Observed Session Feedback

Please find below the observed session feedback for my session on Tromp l’Oeil. First from the tutor section which observed the first 30 mins and the peer section which observed the final 30mins

 The feedback is very positive with some great learning points and actions i can take for the future. Such as

Always check learning agreements before class

“You provided students with a few pages from a key source and asked them in turn to read a few paragraphs. Reading aloud without prior warning could have caused a student with dyslexia significant anxiety, even in the small group context, and I wonder whether there were other ways to share this information without putting anyone on the spot.”

Other points of delivery could have been used for this section, an important lesson!

“Regarding time, the practical task ran on longer than your lesson plan indicated and this is worth taking into account in future planning. It wasn’t clear whether the exercise was meant to take 10 or 20 minutes as there was a typo in the lesson plan. Whilst you might expect one student to undertake something like this exercise in 10 minutes, another may take 20. In a day-long session this can usually be absorbed, but in a shorter session you might want to state clearly at the start of the exercise how long the students have to work on it.”

A good point to make about being wary of timings for exercises, but to also double check work. I have been guilty of this throughout the module but i feel my proof reading skills (for essays) has improved. I can keep improving! Timing is also important for the flow of the class but i must not sacrifice student development to keep to a strict schedule, there must be a balance.

Alway create a supportive and engaging environment. Both feedbacks brought this up:

“You managed the learning environment very well, ensuring the students had what they required to engage in the lesson. This added to the general feeling that the session was flowing and engaging.”

“With no personal knowledge of scenic art, I felt that even I was able to soak up a bit of information during the time spent as his lesson was very clear. He built on ability throughout the session in a supportive and useful way.

A very positive outcome from the session. It had always been my goal to engage the learner to the subject to create an emerging professional with a passion for new skills and ideas.

 

Module 2: The Teaching Artist

 

 

ASSESSMENT MODE SUBMISSION
 

Assessment Mode 2 – Observed Sessions

 

Tutor Observed Session

 

STUDENT NAME:

 

Scott McIntosh

 

ASSESSOR ROLE
 

 

In preparation for this observed session the student should have provided you with a copy of

·      their ‘Lesson Plan’ outlining the aims, structure and content for the module

·      their ‘Theoretical Account’ outlining the learning theories that have underpinned and justified the design of their lesson plan

 

This role requires you to Observe a 30-minute session (or 30 minutes of a longer session) and provide written feedback on the criteria below.

 

 

 
ASSESSMENT CRITERIA
 

 

In the observed session, was there sufficient evidence that the student was able to:

 

·      Demonstrate the ability to use and justify relevant theories and evidence informed practice to design and plan a learning activity?

 

·      Demonstrate the ability to apply theories in practice to teach and support learning?

 

·      Create an effective learning environment to support learning?

 

·      Effectively assess and give feedback to learners?

 

 

FEEDBACK

 I observed the first 30 minutes of your one-day lesson on Trompe L’Oeil painting for 2nd year BA Production Arts and Design students and from the outset it was clear that you had already built up a strong rapport with your learners. Your approach throughout the session was supportive, calm and encouraging and you used humour very well to help build an inclusive and relaxed atmosphere.

In introducing the session, you were very clear in explaining to the students what they would be engaging in throughout the session and on how their progress would be assessed. You provided some very good printed resources which supported your discussion about the history of the topic, clarifying in a strongly visual way the scope of the subject and what is meant by Trompe l’Oeil painting.

You provided students with a few pages from a key source and asked them in turn to read a few paragraphs. Reading aloud without prior warning could have caused a student with dyslexia significant anxiety, even in the small group context, and I wonder whether there were other ways to share this information without putting anyone on the spot. Perhaps providing the document ahead of the session would have helped, or to have made the reading more optional. In the session this wasn’t an issue and your learners appeared to engage well with the concepts and ideas.

The discussion that accompanied the text was engaging and you facilitated this in a relaxed and supportive manner, relating the concepts to the production work the students would directly engage in.

The use of a model, light and illustration to discuss the principles of light was very helpful, though I wonder if an accurate print out illustrating the key aspects might have been beneficial here, especially as the whiteboard didn’t really provide an wholly accurate visual (the midpoints were white and the highlights were green). The concepts were clear, but perhaps a hand-out would ensure greatest retention.

The following exercise using a small piece of moulding was well explained and you supported learners throughout as they attempted to accurately represent the light and shadow elements. I know time was limited here, but I wonder whether an exercise using the sphere might have preceded this slightly more complicated task.

Regarding time, the practical task ran on longer than your lesson plan indicated and this is worth taking into account in future planning. It wasn’t clear whether the exercise was meant to take 10 or 20 minutes as there was a typo in the lesson plan. Whilst you might expect one student to undertake something like this exercise in 10 minutes, another may take 20. In a day-long session this can usually be absorbed, but in a shorter session you might want to state clearly at the start of the exercise how long the students have to work on it.

During the exercise you took the opportunity to reference key elements of the videos that you had asked the students to watch before the session. You brought this content into the discussion in a relaxed and natural way.

It was clear from your session that you had incorporated the core elements of the learning theories expressed in your Theoretical Account in a very effective manner. The key observation here was that you had a strong theoretical foundation underpinning your decisions for content and facilitation of learning, and this was integrated cohesively into the session.

You managed the learning environment very well, ensuring the students had what they required to engage in the lesson. This added to the general feeling that the session was flowing and engaging.

In summary this session was engaging, informative and delivered with a calm confidence and supportive humour.

 

 

ASSESSED BY: Jamie Mackay

 

ROLE: Head of PG Learning and Teaching and Academic Development
DATE: 28/4/16

 

 

 

Module 2: The Teaching Artist

 

 

ASSESSMENT MODE SUBMISSION
 

Assessment Mode 2 – Observed Sessions

 

Peer Observed Session

 

STUDENT NAME:

Scott MacIntosh

 

ASSESSOR ROLE
 

 

In preparation for this observed session the student should have provided you with a copy of

·      their ‘Lesson Plan’ outlining the aims, structure and content for the module

·      their ‘Theoretical Account’ outlining the learning theories that have underpinned and justified the design of their lesson plan

 

This role requires you to Observe a 30-minute session (or 30 minutes of a longer session) and provide written feedback on the criteria below.

 

 

 

 
ASSESSMENT CRITERIA
 

 

In the observed session, was there sufficient evidence that the student was able to:

 

·      Demonstrate the ability to use and justify relevant theories and evidence informed practice to design and plan a learning activity?

·      Demonstrate the ability to apply theories in practice to teach and support learning?

·      Create an effective learning environment to support learning?

·      Effectively assess and give feedback to learners?

 

FEEDBACK

 

 I observed part of Scotts class, towards the end of the day. The students were continuing with their painting and Scott was offering continual feedback and support. He then got them to complete a pop quiz about the processes used and he then had a group discussion with the students about how they felt the class had gone, and how they felt about their learning and ability.

Prior to the session, having read the lesson plan and theoretical account, and during the session, I observed Scott:

 Demonstrate the ability to use and justify relevant theories and evidence informed practice to design and plan a learning activity.

Scott’s lesson plan showed that he had a very good understanding, as he was able to design and plan a class that gradually built the students’ knowledge and practical abilities through visual aids, discussion, taught sessions and practical experience.

Demonstrate the ability to apply theories in practice to teach and support learning.

 Scott sent the students films of techniques, etc. to watch before coming to his class so that they had a basic understanding of what they would be doing prior to trying it for themselves. He also had handouts with further information for them to read. He talked them through the process himself to clarify and reinforce the knowledge. His lesson plan seemed to have a good balance of practical demonstration, discussion, activity and feedback.

Create an effective learning environment to support learning?

Even though I observed the class late on in the day, he was still teaching valuable skills and supporting the students, he didn’t teach the skills and then stand back and observe. He continually went round the room checking the students were ok, if they had questions he answered them or he would ask them questions that would lead them to rethink how they were approaching certain stages of the work.

 Effectively assess and give feedback to learners?

            Scott handed out a pop quiz at the end of the session, to test the students’                 knowledge and see what had been retained. He asked them to complete the quiz themselves, rather than asking them questions out loud in the group. He then got them all together for a discussion at the end. This worked really well, as they were able to complete the quiz privately and then discuss the answers, rather than comparing each other’s knowledge. It was very informal and a nice touch.

He then had a discussion about how the students felt about their work and how well they’d done. Again this was very informal, and Scott was very good at listening to each students individually and letting them talk, before offering advice or asking them questions which led them to think about what they’d discussed. He didn’t push the conversation in any direction for himself, he was very good and very supportive of their feelings about their work.

He talked them through their strengths and areas where they could improve. He also discussed the idea of them having other, similar classes’ out-with production work, and what skills they would like to work on.

 I felt the part of the session I observed, the handout I had access to and the planning paperwork that I saw beforehand were all of a very good standard. With no personal knowledge of scenic art, I felt that even I was able to soak up a bit of information during the time spent as his lesson was very clear. He built on ability throughout the session in a supportive and useful way.

 

BY: Cate Mackie

 

ROLE: Peer Assessor
DATE: 22/4/16

 

 

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